Edgefield

View on Square Edgefield SC

William Gregg of Edgefield County, South Carolina

William Gregg, the builder of Graniteville, was a native of West Virginia, and came to Edgefield when he was about twenty years old. He married Marina Jones, of Ridge Spring. His brother-in-law, General James Jones, and Colonel John Bauskett had built a cotton factory at Vaucluse and tried to run and operate it with slave labor. Their success was not great, the laborers not having the requisite skill and expertness. Mr. Gregg concluded to use white laborers at Graniteville, and succeeded in his enterprise. In 1858, Mr. Gregg and Colonel James Carroll, afterwards one of the chancellors of the State, …

William Gregg of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

William Padgett of Edgefield County, South Carolina

William Padgett was also a worthy and prominent citizen of this section. He never sought nor held any public position. Indeed it may be said of the Padgetts that they are remarkable for their love of private life, William Padgett’s wife was Margaret Denny, sister of Colonel David Denny, of whom mention has already been made. He was quite wealthy before the war but at its close he was not rich. For honesty, industry, and general integrity of character he had few superiors. Rev. Mahlon D. Padgett, of Mount Willing, and Mr. David Padgett, of the Ridge, are his sons. …

William Padgett of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

John A. Crouder of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Rev. John A. Crouder helped to raise and organize Company D of the Nineteenth Regiment. He first belonged to a company commanded by Robert Meriwether, which went against Fort Sumter and then to Virginia. When the time of his enlistment expired he returned home and assisted Ira Cromley to raise Company D. Cromley was elected Captain; Crouder, 1st Lieutenant; E. B. Forrest, 2nd; and Isaac Edwards, 3rd. After a few months, Cromley, Forrest, and Edwan’s, “who were too old for service, resigned and retired, and Crouder was promoted to be Captain. When the regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Mississippi, Crouder …

John A. Crouder of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

Travis

In the good old days there lived on Mine Creek an industrious man named Travis. His wife bore him no children and she was frequently begging her neighbors to make her a present of one; but the neighbors did not feel like parting from one of their own in this way. At last, however, her importunate prayer was gratified in a way she had not anticipated. Going out one morning to the cow pen as usual to milk her cows, she found hanging on the bars a little bundle carefully done up, which on examination she found containing a fine …

Travis Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

Rev. John Manly of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Rev. John Manly married a daughter of Zebulon Rudolph, of Red Bank, about the year 1825, and remained in Edgefield a good many years. The mention of Rudolph recalls to my memory an old Edgefield tradition that the celebrated Marshal Ney of France, the bravest of the brave, was a Rudolph, born on Red Bank, in Edgefield District, and that his name was Michael Rudolph; that in his youth he went to France; enlisted in the army; soon became noted for his bravery; was made corporal, sergeant, lieutenant. At that period, in the history of France when promotion once began …

Rev. John Manly of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

Catlett Connor of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Catlett Connor, a very celebrated character in that day, and who was elected to the State Senate over Eldred Simkins, afterwards member of Congress and one of the most eminent men in the State, lived near Ninety-Six in the house, the residence in 1891, of Hon. Calvin W. Kinard. This Mr. Connor was a blacksmith, a man of intelligence and of great force of character. Being considerably ambitious and jealous of the influence of the Butler and Simkins families in the county, and thinking that they were getting rather more offices than they were fairly entitled to, wrote and published …

Catlett Connor of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

Christian Priber of Edgefield County, South Carolina

We have seen that although there were occasional wrongs done by both whites and Indians, yet it is probable that there would have been no general war between the English settlers and the natives of the upper country had it not been for the intrigues of the French. At an early day the French had occupied the northern portions of the Continent; they had passed westward through the Great Lakes; had found the upper part of the Mississippi; had explored that river to its mouth; had founded the city of New Orleans; had built a chain of forts from its …

Christian Priber of Edgefield County, South Carolina Read More »

View on Square Edgefield SC

Perrys, Colemans, Trotters, &c

There were other early settlers in that part of Edgefield bordering on Big Saluda and Persimmon Creek, not yet mentioned. These were the Perrys, Colemans, Trotters, Berrys, Nunns, Summerses, Rileys, and McCartys, to say nothing as yet of the Brookses. As the settlements in Abbeville began about the same time with those on the Saluda side of Edgefield, we will make a little excursion into that county. Both counties being parts of the original District of Ninety-Six their histories are necessarily very intimately connected. In the year 1756, the same year in which the Culbreaths came to “Scotland,” Patrick Calhoun, …

Perrys, Colemans, Trotters, &c Read More »

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top