Edgefield

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Edgefield County Settlers of Various Nationalities

Edgefield, like other parts of the middle sections of the State, was settled by people representing the various nationalities of Europe—English, Scotch, Irish, Welch, German, Dutch, and French, English predominating so greatly as to make the English language the language of the country; though several others are spoken in the United States in different sections and are the everyday language of the people, especially German, Swedish, and French. Like other parts of the upper country, Edgefield received many settlers from the North, from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina; and also perhaps some few from colonies farther North. Some also …

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Thomas G. Clemson of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Thomas G. Clemson, son-in-law of John C. Calhoun, once lived in Coleman Township, near Red Bank. Mr. Calhoun often visited Mrs. Clemson, and while on these visits it was that I had the good fortune to see Mr. Calhoun several times; and also Mr. Clemson. It was during the time that Mr. Calhoun’s Dahlonega gold mines were at their best. Mr. Clemson was telling how rich the mines were, and by way of illustration he took off an old fur cap which he was wearing, and said that on one occasion he brought up from the mine in which they …

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Dr. William Mobley of Edgefield County, South Carolina

In 1854, Dr. William Mobley was elected to the Legislature. His grandfather, Jeremiah Mobley, came to Edgefield just after the Revolutionary War from North Carolina, and settled near Fruit Hill. His father, John Mobley, married Lucretia Simkins. They left three sons, William, Eldred, and John. William was born in 1809. He first married Harriet Goode, of Centre Springs. She died soon. He then married Susannah Neal, daughter of Hugh Neal, a wealthy gentleman of Irish descent. Dr. Mobley was a deacon of Red Bank Church for a long time. He was a man of very fine appearance, pleasing manner, and …

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William Gregg of Edgefield County, South Carolina

William Gregg, the builder of Graniteville, was a native of West Virginia, and came to Edgefield when he was about twenty years old. He married Marina Jones, of Ridge Spring. His brother-in-law, General James Jones, and Colonel John Bauskett had built a cotton factory at Vaucluse and tried to run and operate it with slave labor. Their success was not great, the laborers not having the requisite skill and expertness. Mr. Gregg concluded to use white laborers at Graniteville, and succeeded in his enterprise. In 1858, Mr. Gregg and Colonel James Carroll, afterwards one of the chancellors of the State, …

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William Padgett of Edgefield County, South Carolina

William Padgett was also a worthy and prominent citizen of this section. He never sought nor held any public position. Indeed it may be said of the Padgetts that they are remarkable for their love of private life, William Padgett’s wife was Margaret Denny, sister of Colonel David Denny, of whom mention has already been made. He was quite wealthy before the war but at its close he was not rich. For honesty, industry, and general integrity of character he had few superiors. Rev. Mahlon D. Padgett, of Mount Willing, and Mr. David Padgett, of the Ridge, are his sons. …

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John A. Crouder of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Rev. John A. Crouder helped to raise and organize Company D of the Nineteenth Regiment. He first belonged to a company commanded by Robert Meriwether, which went against Fort Sumter and then to Virginia. When the time of his enlistment expired he returned home and assisted Ira Cromley to raise Company D. Cromley was elected Captain; Crouder, 1st Lieutenant; E. B. Forrest, 2nd; and Isaac Edwards, 3rd. After a few months, Cromley, Forrest, and Edwan’s, “who were too old for service, resigned and retired, and Crouder was promoted to be Captain. When the regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Mississippi, Crouder …

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Travis

In the good old days there lived on Mine Creek an industrious man named Travis. His wife bore him no children and she was frequently begging her neighbors to make her a present of one; but the neighbors did not feel like parting from one of their own in this way. At last, however, her importunate prayer was gratified in a way she had not anticipated. Going out one morning to the cow pen as usual to milk her cows, she found hanging on the bars a little bundle carefully done up, which on examination she found containing a fine …

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Rev. John Manly of Edgefield County, South Carolina

Rev. John Manly married a daughter of Zebulon Rudolph, of Red Bank, about the year 1825, and remained in Edgefield a good many years. The mention of Rudolph recalls to my memory an old Edgefield tradition that the celebrated Marshal Ney of France, the bravest of the brave, was a Rudolph, born on Red Bank, in Edgefield District, and that his name was Michael Rudolph; that in his youth he went to France; enlisted in the army; soon became noted for his bravery; was made corporal, sergeant, lieutenant. At that period, in the history of France when promotion once began …

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